Aug
31

Hank3 Talks New Albums, Fatherhood, Shooter, XXX

August 31, 2011 - By Trigger  //  News  //  48 Comments

In about a week, Hank Williams III, or Hank3, will be releasing an unprecedented 4 albums via his own independent label, and then heading out on a West Coast tour. The albums can now be pre-ordered at hank3.com.

Ahead of the releases and tour, I talked with the head hellbilly himself about the new albums, the sordid legacy of fatherhood in the Hank Williams lineage, his role as one of the founding fathers of the country music underground, Shooter Jennings and his XXX movement, and how he feels about the unfinished songs of Hank Williams project. The full 30-minute interview can be listened to or downloaded below, and the major points are transcribed under that.

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Triggerman: There’s a lot of Cajun influences in this new music. I know you’re friends with Phil Anselmo of Pantera and Down, and Kyle Turley who played for the New Orleans Saints. Also when the Grand Ole Opry kicked Hank out, the Louisiana Hayride stuck with him. Did any of that have an influence on your Cajun approach, or was it simply a love of the music?

Hank3: Yes, Hank Williams had a deep connection to Louisiana, had a lot of friends from there that were really close to him. My dad was born in Baton Rouge. I used to go to Louisiana a lot as a kid, and get back in the swamps and some of the Cajun honky tonks. For me, that style of music, when I’m in a very unsettled place, the old Cajun music like Nathan Abshire and all these guys, the old recordings helped me out tremendously. There was something really magical about the way they recorded that stuff back in the day. It’s more friend and family oriented. A lot of raw emotion comes through some of those older recordings. And to me it was trying to do something that was just a little different.

Triggerman: Some of the songs you’re singing in French. Did you study Cajun music and French in preparation for this album, more than just listening to the stuff you’ve been hearing over the years?

Hank3: Just over the years I’ve got to meet a lot of people. There’s not just one style of it, there’s many, and it just kind of depends on what part you’re in. Yeah, there was a little bit of studying and a lot of my friends know how to go there. It’s more of a feeling than anything. It was a lot of fun. In the daytime I would be serious, from about 9 AM to 6 PM. Then from about 7 PM to midnight I’d be breaking the rules and letting things flow a lot more easily. My take on these new country records is there’s only five or six songs on there that I would consider country.

Triggerman: You’re saying a lot of this stuff isn’t country, and I would tend to disagree. It may not be country in a traditional sense, but I don’t know what else you would call it. Tom Waits appears on this album, and he’s kind of made a career of making music that is hard to define.

Hank3: I’m just saying that out of respects to my fans. Some of the Cajun stuff has a country feel. But I at least have to say that to my fans, because it’s a new line for a Hank3 country record.

Hank3 & Trooper

Triggerman: Your dog Trooper is also featured prominently on this album. As I’ve been following the career of Hank3, Trooper makes these occasional appearances. How’s Trooper doing these days, he must be getting old?

Hank3: He’s getting up there, he’s about 12. But he’s hanging in there for me. He’s one of my #1 dogs. This is the 3rd record he’s been on. He was on “H8 Line”. He was on “Karmageddon”. Now he’s on “Trooper’s Holler” which I think is a crossover song that I think a lot of kids are gonna identify with. Even when David Allan Coe heard it he said, “That’s a little different, huh?” Then you’ve got “Trooper’s Chaos”. He would sing to that song every time I’d be working on it, so I just put him on the recording. My dogs have been like family to me. My music and my dogs have always helped me through my darker hours.

Triggerman: There’s been a lot of made about you leaving Curb. That’s a 15 year relationship that has come to an end. But the whole reason you got involved with Curb is you had a lawsuit brought against you from a one night stand and you were forced to sign the Curb contract. But through that time you were unable to see your son, but you had to pay for him.

Hank3: They were very rude about it. They served me papers on stage. I was opening up a show for Buzzoven, 5 metro officers walked in to serve me papers. I held up my end of the deal and made sure I wasn’t a deadbeat dad. He never saw that money. Most of that money went to her. Nowadays I’m able to be there for him, talk to him on a good or bad day. I’m glad it finally made a full circle, and that we got connected.

Triggerman: On the song “Guttertown” there’s a line, “Had me a friend in Birmingham, got a 20 year sentence for a one night stand. At least he did the time for his son.” I surmise that is autobiographical, but when you think about it, Hank Sr. died when Hank Jr. was very young, you’ve been pretty open about how Hank Jr. hasn’t been very involved in your life. Was it a purpose of yours to at least attempt to break that fatherhood cycle that the Hank Williams lineage was in?

Hank3: Yeah, it’s very important. Most Hank Williams didn’t have a father around, even Hank Sr.’s father wasn’t around much. My main thing is (for him to know) that we can talk about anything. I’m just trying to be there for him as much as I can.

Triggerman: There were some others before you, but before you started doing things differently in country, there wasn’t really an “underground” in country music like there was in punk music. There was the mainstream, and sort of the honky tonk circuit. You helped create this underground, probably at the start of your career, but especially in earnest when you release your album Straight to Hell. Do you feel like you’re aware of that fact, and just how many bands you’ve inspired, and do you feel like you’re aware of what’s going on in this movement?

Hank3: The big thing to me is the work ethic. I could have took the easy way, I chose the hard way. I’m glad I’m offering inspiration to others, because that’s the biggest payoff music can give you.

Nowadays I can run a bus and a crew and keep ticket prices at $24 to $28 maximum. These people charging $250 a ticket is just ridiculous to see a live show. That’s not what country music is about. It’s about emotions, and being connected to your fans, and those working men and women out there. All in all I’m just out here, doing what I do, trying to inspire those bands out there to record themselves. Nowadays the independents have an opportunity they didn’t have 20 years ago. You don’t need a major label. All my new records are done on that same D1600 machine Straight to Hell was done on.

Triggerman: Are you aware of this movement Shooter Jennings started called XXX? And if you are, what are your opinions on it?

Hank3: No. I’m on the go so much, I haven’t listened to anything current. I’ve just been having to get everyone on my team on the same page. I don’t have no management, no secretaries, nothing man. It’s 24/7, full-on, doing it all myself. I haven’t been able to listen to a radio show in a long time. It’s just because I’m so busy right now. I might have heard of it, but I’ve not heard it. I don’t know what it involves or what it entails, or any of that stuff.

Triggerman: And you’ve had a feud over the years with Shooter. What are your feelings on Shooter right now, or are you aware enough of what he’s doing to have any feelings about him?

Hank3: Well back in the day I had to just call him out because he was clean shaven and wanted to be a rock band and all that. That was back in the past, now it’s the present. He knows I’ve had to say my peace. As Phil Anselmo would say, yesterday don’t mean shit. That’s just where it is right now.

Triggerman: You’re pretty famous for calling out pop country over the years, as well as fighting with Curb Records. Tim McGraw is going though a big battle with Curb Records right now. As ironic as it is, do you feel some sense of camaraderie with artists like Tim McGraw, LeAnn Rimes, and Clay Walker that are coming out against Curb, and do you feel some sense of relief, because I’m sure some would portray Hank3 as a troublemaker, and now the problems are across the board with Curb’s artists.

Hank3: I’ll say most people who thought I was riding coattails now know I’m a real musician, and I play music because that’s what I do and I love it. It goes back to greed. Look at how many millions of dollars Curb Records made off of Tim McGraw. I didn’t make them that much money. It just goes back to not good business. Curb is just a better politician than he is a musician. And it doesn’t matter if it’s the music business or the racing business, once people get involved with him, they usually don’t have anything good to say about him in the end. Look at the money some of those acts have made him, and it’s still not enough? Yeah, that’s some pretty serious greed. And that’s pretty non-Christian if you sit down and think about it. That’s a shame he’s not respecting the musician.

Triggerman: There’s an album coming out with Bob Dylan taking unfinished Hank Williams songs and handing them out to personalities to finish. You’ve said in other interviews you weren’t asked to finish any of these songs. If you had been asked to finish one of these songs, would you have done that?

Hank3: I don’t know, that’s a tough question. I’ve always just wanted to stand on my own two feet and be recognized as Hank3. What amazes me is how upset it’s making my fans. That’s what’s really impressive to me is how they feel so offended, and feel like it’s so wrong. I’ve got nothing against Bob Dylan. He’s been an amazing songwriter and done his thing for many many years. When you’re dealing with unfinished Hank Williams stuff, that’s a pretty heavy topic. To give someone that opportunity, I just don’t know man, that’s pretty tough. But I’ve never been asked (to appear) on much. The fans are very upset, and I guess I’ll just let them do my speaking for me. Because I can’t go and say something against Bob Dylan. That’s just not right man. I’d say maybe they need to scope out Hank Jr. a little more than me.

48 Comments to “Hank3 Talks New Albums, Fatherhood, Shooter, XXX”

  • Nice read, stoked he’s on his own now and really stoked about his new albums coming out soon. And the Hank Williams album being “finished”, they should just let that dog lie.

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  • Great interview!! Thanks so much!

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  • good interview…cant wait to hear the new songs..

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  • Awesome. I have been waiting for this interview for years. I can’t imagine how excited you were to get this interview Triggerman. Lots of good info here. 3 has shined some light on his fans. I respect 3 even more after this interview. I was really unsure of his views on the underground scene, and what he was doing for his fans. He’s made it clear that he’s just too damn busy keeping us entertained to get involved politically in this underground scene. Good for him. He’s doing what he does best!

    It almost makes me wonder if Shooter should be doing the same thing. Maybe he’s not spending enough time entertaining and too busy organizing and being political. I guess his new album will tell all.

    Thanks for this Triggerman! Made my day!

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  • great interview. it was good to hear him speak again….. cant wait to hear that Ray Lawrence song…. thank you Triggerman

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  • I’d say Shelton is showing good leadership skills by not getting overly dramatic about some pressing issues on this scene if that’s what you want to call it. Just focusing on work like all men should do.

    Devil horns up to Shelton!

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  • Nice interview. Great to hear from him again. This new album can’t come soon enough. I actually think I might wind up liking the A.D.D. stuff more than the country stuff but that said this country stuff seems like it may be his best country release yet. I do think he is shorting himself by not listening to any of the underground country scene. Seems like stuff like Joseph Huber’s solo album would be right up 3′s alley considering the dark vibe that much of it has. Anyways… I’ll be driving 65 miles one way on tues. to get these releases and we might take the long way home just so we can take this shit in. When can we expect a review Triggerman?

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    • I will be posting individual reviews of at least the two country albums on the release day, or shortly thereafter.

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  • [...] Saving Country Music interviewed Hank3 about his upcoming albums, his feelings about The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams, fatherhood, and his history with Curb Records. [...]

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  • Awesome interview. Can’t wait till the albums are out.

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  • Great job Trig. I can’t wait for the new stuff myself. I pre-ordered the country(or sort of country?) stuff on CD and vinyl from Hank3′s website. A friend of mine in Nashville-Her husband is a good friend of Shelton’s and she got the discs in the last few days from the man himself. She says it’s AMAZING.
    That’s good enough for me. I can’t wait.
    Y’all take care.

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  • Trig, I was too lazy to read the interview but I wasn’t too lazy to push play on the media player and take a listen. As most folks who listen to my show I am a little hard on III (a.k.a 3). I was glad to hear you bring up some more personal stuff. If I ever had him on IBWIP that is the route I would go as well. Here is what I thought of the Q & A. 1.) I give him ALOT of credit for sticking with his son even though he had to go through so much crap. As a father experiancing the same “lawyer” issues and difficulties. A+ for him on that topic. 2.) The Underground Scene- I think he pretty much “admitted” in the interview that he doesn’t have time for it or care what is going on in it. This is both good and bad. Good because he isnt getting all wrapped up in the drama that seems to rear its ugly head in “the scene” and Bad because as such a prodominent figure in the underground us fans look to him to lead or guide. I know he has been the most noteable person in the last 10 years to be attached to the “underground” scene, but that doesnt mean he is the biggest advicate. Like one of the comments above, he is too busy entertaining to pay attention, and that is a good thing. I am not a Shooter or Hank3 side taker. They are both doing what they need to do to say Nashville suck ballz. They are each just doing it a different way. 3.) I am also glad that he said in the interview that the country album is really not country. The songs he stated that were are but the rest are not. I have thought alot about what I thought of the album(s) and I have come to this conclusion… Hank3 is going to do what he wants to do. Never satified on focusing on one or two styles. I guess I give him credit for that. Myself, I am a selfish SOB and long for the Hank3 on LBandD. I need to realize that that is no longer the focus. I can get all wordy about the new album (only speaking of the country ones) but I’ll just say that I give it a C. 4.) The thoughts that he shared regarding the unfinished HWSR songs- Ya he should have been asked. Hell, they shouldn’t even be doing it! But he took the PC route with his answer and that is the best. I think a few years back he would have cussed all those involved or something, maybe maturity in that aspect has caught up with him which is a good thing. Listen, I don’t hate Hank3 I just wish I could get the music out of him that I like and wish I could go to a show and not see chicks with bloody noses coming out of the crowd. I will give him much respect in that yes, he could be getting ALOT more per ticket at his shows but he keeps it at least reasonable. He doesnt dick his fans over that way that is for sure. So now that I have rambled on.. what I meant to say Trigger is that the interview was good. Not the normal interview with the BLAH BLAH BLAH answers.

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    • Thanks Blake. I honestly don’t do that many interviews, and wasn’t sure if I was going to do one now, even though my “Free Hank III” restrictions on interacting with him had been lifted, and anyone and everyone else was interviewing him. But the same questions seem to keep getting not asked, so I wanted to take the opportunity.

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    • Well-said Blake. I have not heard the new album(s) yet, and I’ve not seen the bloody noses at shows, but otherwise I think I agree with everything you said here.

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    • You really want him to re-write Lovesick Broke and Driftin’ and never progress? Maybe he’ll revisit that someday but I don’t want him to stagnate and become the AC/DC of country.

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      • As a matter of fact, yes. Yes I would..

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  • Nice stuff here. Now you got me in a scramble to come up with different questions for tonight, haha. Great work though.

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    • Totally agree, lol. I was reading this and I was like, damn, now I gotta think about some real good questions haha.

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  • If the country albums aren’t country, then what are they? Are they hard rock with a country vibe?

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    • Not hard rock at all. Just different. Very hard to put a label on most tunes.

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      • I’d say Shelton made them his own. Eccletic and real, the way he wanted to with Curb but couldn’t because the studio head wouldn’t let him express himself musically. Great interview Triggerman and glad to hear Shelton feel more at ease. It comes across like a cool mountain breeze.

        As far as the ticket prices go, much respect for that. Greed doesn’t get a man anywhere but looking back in life. Shelton is wise enough to know that if your fans can’t afford to come on out to a show, then what’s the point? I know I appreciate it!

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  • Great interview… can’t wait to see Hank3 here in ABQ on Sept.17

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  • Wow, I’m really exited for these new albums. I’m kind of nervous too, with the whole french thing and Hank saying that it’s not really country. I hope he doesn’t stray too far from his previous work. Everything from lovesick, broke, and driftin on up has been genius though so I’m not too worried

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  • How do half the posters have the albums already? I’m freaking out waiting for mine, man. I like Lovesick the best, too, but I’m always open to a new sound. I think the teased Wayne Hancock/Hank3 joint album could be EPIC.

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    • For reviewing purposes.

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  • Good interview. Not just because I am one of those waiting for next week big release, but it gives a good picture of the artist. And I really like that picture, especially the way he has matured. It must do him a ton of good to be free from Curb, giving him the energy to do it all by himself. That’s what I respect most in III, taking the hard road.
    That, and keeping the price for concert-tickets as low as possible.
    To support my local record-store, which started punk-inspired in the earlie 80s, I am going to buy III’s new cds not online, but at De Waaghals in Nijmegen, Holland.

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  • Great interview! I hope I can see him in Dallas! Anyone from the East Texas area making the pilgrimage to Dallas? Hell, I will take a Greyhound if I have to.

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  • you asked all the right questions trig. great interview. i wish he would’ve given a little more direct response to your question regarding STH though. i feel like he doesn’t realize the impact that album had or the underground scene that pretty much spawned from him. i’d like to see him become more involved and aware with it but i guess its cool that he just likes to do his own thing

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  • Great interview. As for the album, well.. I’m gonna go ahead and say that it’s easily his best “Country” album since STH. There is a LOT of stuff going on here (especially on “Guttertown”) and time will tell, but I do think it matches “Straight to Hell”. Of course opinions will vary, but this is a very important album at a very important point in his career and I’m amazed with the results. Can’t wait to get Triggerman’s take on it.

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  • 3 said before STH “This is the album that’s really gonna set it all off.” He knows it’s impact and shortly after it’s follow up he had something on, i think his myspace saying “it’s not as good as STH.” I think he has been holding back on the last few records on purpose because of Curb. Whatever the case may be, I love C&W and I love people trying new things, I hate hearing people say they’d wish he’d stay the same. The only thing about his music that keeps me coming back is that it never is the same record. love em or hate em the last two albums have been widely different. I wish people would quit giving the guy a hard time and just be greatful that he’s out there doin’ what he’s doin’. There’s a lot of people doing the same thing over and over again, just cause 3 did it better than them doesn’t mean he should repeat it, IMO. Can’t wait to hear the new stuff, thanks for the music and the good times, Hank.

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    • I agree wholeheartedly. I used AC/DC as an example above. For the last 30 years they’ve had some quality releases but when I want to listen to them I’m still grabbin’ Highway to Hell or Back in Black. If 3 tried to write LB&D over and over again I’d probably just listen to the original. Glad to see him being honest with the fans about what they are getting and not trying to dupe them like Curb did by changing This Ain’t Country to Hillbilly Joker.

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  • I stumbled on this site. I am a steadfast supported of traditional country music. However, I do listen to alot of types of music, including Hank III, I own 3 of his albums. I have came to this site thinking it was a site for traditional country music, upon reading various comments I would like to say to Triggerman(if he runs this site) that I find this site a bit hypocritical in its views. A artist like Hank III is doing no more to save country music than a Jason Aldean or a Kid Rock. I notice Hank III gets alot of pub on this site. Aldean and Rock get ripped apart for bringing rap to country….for good reason. Hank III does punk and metal also, how is he saving country music. Hes doing things far removed from good old country music. Also, I see alot of comments about the new faux outlaws in country these days. Again they get ripped for good reason for envoking the names of past outlaws to further their image. How is a group like Hellbound Glory any different. Yes the music isnt pop country but they name drop as well. Just because an artist isnt mainstream or has a rough sound why do they get the right to name drop, they are doing it for their image as well. I see artist who are also doing a genre called cowpunk on this site, that aint real country my friend. In closing Rascal Flatts and Taylor Swift are killing country music but country acts doing metal,punk, or cowpunk aint saving country music…….not trying to be a a**hole but I would like your response. thanks.

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    • http://www.savingcountrymusic.com/about-saving-country-music will tell you all about this site and its purpose. :)

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    • Not that I was asked… But when you say that “country acts doing metal, punk or cowpunk aren’t saving country music”, I would disagree in so much as I am on this site learning of and enjoying country acts that are actually REAL country acts, such as Adam Lee or Dale Watson or Caleb Klauder, because of Hank3 and other non traditional country artists. If not for 3 and stuff like Those Poor Bastards I never would have visited this site. I never would have searched for underground country. I had written modern day country off some 15 years ago. Sorry for my run-on sentence above.

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      • No question Dale Watson is country, even though Hank III may bring folks to this site, it just bothers me a little that for some to do metal or whatever is ok but for this guy to do rap is wrong. I think it aint country music. When Hank III was fairly new I went to see him. He did half country and half metal. I now know thats his thing now but I was put off by it. Im from the old school I guess, but in my opinion some folks on this site see Hank III and others doing metal as bucking the system and not apoligizing for it. How does he fit in the relm of country music. You mentioned Dale Watson he does traditional country, great writing, one of the best and keeps actual country alive. No gimmicks just country. Its just funny to me alot of these bands dont do all country and name drop and just because its not mainstream its cool? Ive been a fan of real country for far to long and just had to sprak my mind…..when I say real country I mean Waylon,Wille,George,Merle, hell Mel Street,Don Williams,Gary Stewart,Billy Joe Shaver,Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff Walker Im not even gonna get into Bluegrass. Maybe Im too old school for this site, I dont know. I just think this site is for a certain genre of music not traditional.

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        • You should stick it out on here Roy. I don’t like everything covered but there is a lot of stuff unearthed on here that I do. And I see what you are saying about the name dropping. To me it just depends on the context and vibe I guess. It’s very subjective. For instance on Hank3′s last album he name dropped Buck Owens on the opening track and I’ll bet alot of his fans in turn checked him out. It seems to me like the underground was name dropping many years ago in a way to say “this is what we are about” as-well-as to bring attention to those that music row had forgotten. The mainstream has since caught on and acts like they are similar to the legends, and that just isn’t true. It’s hard to claim you are inspired by Waylon when you sound like an MTV act with a southern accent.

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        • Roy, Hank doesn’t do metal to buck the system, he does it because he likes it. Metal ain’t a gimmick for him. For the most part, there’s a pretty distinct line between his metal stuff and his tradional country stuff. And I think it’s pretty damn respectful of him to do his country set first, and then you can leave if don’t like the metal, and his ticket prices are worth just one of his sets at twice the price in my opinion.

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          • Bunch, I couldn’t agree more.

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    • Roy,

      This is a fair concern, and well-voiced. The first thing I want to point out is Hank3 just put out 4 albums, just started a tour today after being off the road for nearly a year, and has finally been granting interviews after about a year off from them as well. In other words, he is dominating the news cycle at the moment. Next month, it will be someone else. I once went 5 months without posting one thing about Hank3, and trust me, his fans let me hear about it. There simply wasn’t anything to report.

      This weekend I was at a music festival called “Muddy Roots”, which roughly represents the movement of music that is covered on this site. We had legends there like Wanda Jackson and Don Maddox of The Maddox Brothers and Rose. We had traditional country artists like Lucky Tubb and Derek Hoke. We also had punk-infused country bands like Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers and Hillbilly Casino, that despite their rough edge, are both seminal to the revitalization of lower Broadway when it was abandoned by corporate Nashville.

      I don’t get paid to do this. In fact it is a losing proposition. But I try to do the best I can. My first article ever was about Dale Watson. I understand your grievance, and look, I just posted two more Hank3 articles back to back. One of which I panned one of his latest albums, and the interview I posted with him a few days ago, he seems to go out of the way himself to say his new stuff does not have much country to it.

      I’m trying to do the best I can, and cover numerous fields of country music. My only requirement is that I must be passionate about what I write about. And right now, that passion is focused on Hank3.

      All the best.

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      • Thank for the reply, I do see where your coming from

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    • Roy, this is a good site and offers some great debate (when allowed…haha) about the topics you bring up. I agree with a lot of what you stated, but I also know that Trigger has opened up my ears to some great real country music from little known bands/artists.

      I think his use of the site name “Saving Country Music” is a heavy phrase and implies certain things, but a lot of what is covered isn’t what that name would imply. However, what he covers offers spirited debate and, for me, rather than fans of an artist turning me off to the artist because they get hypocritical, is something you should allow to happen.

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  • Hell yes Country needs a new brand and my prediction is that Shooter will make being a branded man cool! The industry has bastardized Country with past fads such as pop and rap! News flash-Country plus Rap equals CRAP no matter how pretty you package it! Quit trying to sell us a gimmick and give us back our down home, on the dirt road, by the creek honest music! Who better to save Country Music than this son of a legend-mark my words, he will be a legend as well! Shooter is shooting straight from the hip and right through the heart! Outlaw up, Shooter!! See you at the top of the charts!!

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  • Great intereview, it answers some questions on where has 3 been on some topics?

    I do think his pat on the back about keeping ticket prices low is a bit much. Sure, some super-groups such as U2, Stones, Garth in Vegas (hell any Vegas show) draw $200+/ticket. But There are still plenty of good artists (some mainstream) that you can see for $20-$50/ticket.

    Also, the whole Curb thing… Hank3 was never “forced” to sign that contract. To my knowledge there was no court order to work for Curb. There was a court order to pay support…so he needed a job. Just happens he had a name to get in the door to make some decent money in the career he loves.

    Nice to see 3 back out of the woods!

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  • Thanks so much for this great interview!!!

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  • Great reading and respects to Shelton and you Triggerman! This interview was right on! Great questions! Thanks so much and keep up the great work!!

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  • i just listened to the interview. i read it a while back. better to hear it than read cuz you can hear the emotion in the voices. say what you want about the music, as i listen to a live youtube version of 3 bar cattle for the first time, i gained some more respect for hank 3. to me he’s one of those “good guys” for real. i’ve seen him once in regina saskatchewan and it was fuckin awesome, after the show he of course signed autographs and did pics and i got both, pretty cool, but when i was done i told him it was an awesome show and he thanked me and i said he has to come to saskatoon next time and he asked “saskatoon?” and he said it correctly with his southern accent, and he asked where it was and i told him. so that shows me that he is a true artist, he asked wanting to know. now does he remember? probably not but he wasn’t stand offish. that to me speaks louder than any music he plays, also give rap and hip hop a break, my brother is an awesome rapper who loves underground hip hop and he loved that show just as much as anyone in there. thanks for the interview trigger and keep it up, my bro brought me some scott h biram, from a lady at his work who has seen hank3 numerous times. just remember folks, if it comes from real, it will sound real.

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