Mar
27

Jawga Boyz Reinforce Negative Stereotypes in “Mud Jugs”

March 27, 2012 - By Trigger  //  Down with Pop Country  //  83 Comments

Man.

As Ralphie from The Christmas Story poignantly said after decoding the secret message from Little Orphan Annie: “A crummy commercial? Son of a Bitch!”

I know I’ve come before you proclaiming I’ve unearthed the worst song in history many times, but records were made to be broken and champions to fall, and folks, we have one for the ages here. Country rap is usually bad enough, and bad country rap is even worse. But what makes Athens, GA’s “Jawga Boyz” and the song “MudJug” the cat’s pajamas, the pinnacle of pathetic music, is that when you strip it all down, it’s a crummy commercial. And I don’t mean they made a 30 second spot for a company or an advertising jingle, I mean they literally made a song about a $40 overpriced piece of plastic and released it like you would any other song. Can’t make this up!

The Jawga Boyz (pronounced “Georgia Boys” with an Ebonic accent) are so bad, they can’t even spell their name wrong properly.

This is what they’re trying to do to Southern culture these days folks. They’re taking away your pride, your heritage, your farms, your music, your family life and sense of community, and replacing it with a piece of molded plastic for you to vomit your carcinogenic refuse into after you’ve blessed your oral cavity with the sweet gift of Cancer. Congratulations!

This would be awful enough to get mad about if it wasn’t for the reams of unintended comedy packed throughout this song and video, giving it enough point-and-laugh moments to split your side wide open. Where did they come up with all these shills in this video? Did they drive a bus to a Maury Povich taping and tell everyone to get aboard?

And is anybody else bothered by the fact that there’s little kids in this video with their cheeks puffed out and holding these stupid Mud Jugs? Somebody should call up the Overactive Uptight Committee Against Underage Tobacco Use and sick them on the Jawga Boyz’s asses. It’s fun to pit two groups of knuckleheads against each other!

In fairness, from the looks of it Mug Jugs are made by a cool little company filling a niche demand with an innovative, American-made product, and the Jawga Boyz aren’t some huge band on a major label. Then again, The Jawga Boyz, like most of these country rap acts, have received unbelievable exposure through YouTube, with their “Ridin’ High” video receiving over 1 1 /2 million hits, and “Rollin’ Like A Redneck” almost a million. This is tremendous exposure for 4 dudes with bad rhymes and worse taste backed by a drum machine, and with that exposure should come scrutiny.

The reason The Jawga Boyz and “Mudjug” is worth your ire is because it’s an illustration of the culture war that has polarized the American population. On one side you have people from the city who pride themselves in being healthy and educated and green, that look down their noses at people from the country as uneducated, ultra-consumers of bad products. And then certain people from the country, sensing this judgement, and seeing this stereotype perpetuated by the media and Hollywood, instead of looking to improve themselves or answer this criticism, seem to embrace it by foolishly imbibing in it, to the point of being purposely stupid and unhealthy to their own detriment just to say, “Hell yeah were stupid and unhealthy, and proud of it! You just don’t get it!”

And what gets lost in the middle is the idea of discovering one’s true self, and how that is the best way to break down judgement and stereotypes. Awful acts like The Jawga Boys can find an audience because country people’s self-esteem and traditional culture based on geography, community, and family has been robbed from them, and so to fit in and feel accepted and part of something bigger than themselves, they latch onto whatever dominant culture is presented to them through popular media.

Pop country and hip-hop are the two biggest super-genres, so why not blend them together and present them in the inane and stereotypical country context of spitting tobacco and driving through the mud? In truth, The Jawga Boys aren’t country rap, they’re just rap, and so to overcompensate for their selling out of their own culture, they attempt to counterbalance it by over-emphasizing easily-identifiable, ultra-country behavior, which instead of working against these country stereotypes, reinforces them.

At some point, the idea that music should be felt and not heard seems to have gotten lost. And so did the idea that music should uplift the spirit instead of tearing it down.

Here’s a Saving Country Music healthy replacement to The Jawga Boyz:

83 Comments to “Jawga Boyz Reinforce Negative Stereotypes in “Mud Jugs””

  • I couldn’t watch that video. Chewing tobacco or dipping tobacco is one of the most disgusting habits. What’s worse is people that do it, show off that they do it in disgusting manners like in this video. I also must say, living in GA, I’m familiar with this type of redneck….the video is almost spot on.

       1 likes

  • some folks have no taste in music and insist on foisting their tasteless crap on everyone within earshot. the chocolate drops on the other hand DO have good musical taste. sadly, the folks with no taste seem to be winning.

       1 likes

  • This is total c-rap if you ask me. I’m seeing this social change happen here where I live in Illinois. I currently live in a decent sized city in Central IL with small rural towns all around it. Most of us including myself came from one of these small towns that get their income from farming, factories, and railroads. If you go out to a so-called country bar around here you will see “real” country-farm kids but also see the suburban wannabies and the kids from the trailer park areas located at the outskirts of the city. I hate to be stereotypical but I really think it’s these kids that grow up in these trailer parks or lower income areas who this country-rap is geared towards. These kids grow up with both country redneck friends but also within these areas that they grow up are lower-income black kids. So there is this mixture of rap and country. It’s normal to see a lifted pickup truck with kids listening to both Hank Jr. and Snoop Dog. Do I agree with it? No, but I think it’s the culture alot of people live in nowadays. Especially with the economy the way it is more people are moving towards the cities due to gas prices being so high that they can no longer afford to commute from the rural towns to work in the cities. Now I’m not bashing on kids from trailer parks because I grew up in one also it’s just something I’ve noticed over the years. I really think it’s this migration towards the cities and the cities expanding into rural areas. What are your thoughts?

       1 likes

    • I think most country rap is music for the disenfranchised poor white. It preys on their low self-esteem and their lack of self-worth. I don’t think it is “judgement” to say poor whites in trailer parks are the ones listening to this, because first off, though a stereotype, it’s a pretty accurate one, and second, I’m not looking down my nose at them for being poor and listening to country rap, I feel sorry for them. When I see someone listening to this shit, I see someone suffocating, breathing in bad culture that affects the rest of their lives.

      There is nothing wrong with being poor or living in a trailer. In fact there’s a lot of soul in it. But instead of songs talking about how materialism is wrong and how their proud of living the simple life, they seem to pass judgement on themselves in some misdirected attempt to create pride and self-esteem.

      People looking down their noses at poor people, people living in trailer parks, country rap fans, etc. is part of the problem. This reinforces their anger and lack of self worth. In my opinion the way you solve the problem is education and exposing them to good music. If you’re listening to music talking about how you’re a piece of garbage and proud of it, what is the desire to improve? And I also think there’s a difference in being proud of who you are and where you’re from, and ANGRY about what you see going on in the culture around you, and fighting against it through music. They both may talk about being poor white trash, the importance is from what perspective.

         3 likes

      • Just to clarify I’m not looking down on the poor lower class or those that live in Trailer Parks. As I said I grew up in one. But how do you feel about this being because of the migration of people having to move to these areas due to the economy being in the shithole and gas prices being as high as they are to where those living in the rural areas can no longer afford to commute to the cities for work? Or that cities have expanded into rural areas?

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        • I think gas prices and the “green” movement has a huge part in it. Above I mentioned city people snubbing their noses at folks from the country, and this is one of the reasons. Urban renewal and city real estate has skyrocketed in popularity coinciding with the rise of gas prices. Educated, wealthy white people are moving back into cities after years of white flight. One reason is because they want to be part of stronger communities and commute less. But just like the hybrid car, living in a city is not a choice, but a privilege for the rich.

          I’m glad you picked up on this, because this article coincides with a bunch I have been doing lately talking about economics, geography, and the culture war. Just like my article on hipsters, and then the follow up with the Jonny Corndawg interview, we see that “at some point, this shit has switched” as Jonny said, and what we used to think of as the city culture of bad neighborhoods, and country culture of strong communities, has switched places. I think gas prices has a big part in that. I think music does too.

          Trailer parks are their own study, but yes, I think gas prices, the fall of the family farm, as well as a consumer culture based on materialism has led to their rise, or at least their continuance when you would think we’d have figured out a better housing alternative in 2012.

          For the record, I own a singlewide in New Mexico, and was living in it when I started this site.

             2 likes

          • I hope you didn’t mean you disagree with listening to both country and hip hop. I grew up a fan of country music, and have expanded my horizons to love music. Not a genre. On a daily basis, I can switch from country, to metal, to standards (i.e. Sinatra, Armstrong, Calloway etc.) to punk, and back to country. My kids are the same way. A 9 year old boy’s music taste is greatly influenced by his friends at school, but also by what he hears at home. He played me some music in the car the other day that went from Wiz Kalifia, to Snoop, to Social Distortion, to JayZ to Tom Waits, to the Beastie Boys, and then to Hank Jr. (These are all edited versions, he is after all only 9.) It is possible to combine genres successfully. Punk, and metal. Punk and hip hop, hip hop and metal. Hip hop and swing, punk and swing. Perhaps someday someone smarter than me will figure out a way to combine country and rap. I doubt it, but maybe…..

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          • I personally have no problem with anybody listening to hip-hop, or listening to hip hop and country, and just as I’ve been saying consistently since the rise of country rap that we must make sure NOT automatically discount all attempts to bridge traditionally white and black music, but should judge each artist or project on its individual merit. That is one of the reasons I ended this article with a positive example of this being done.

            People should listen to whatever they want to, and as long as it is done with good intentions and taste, what is it for anybody to judge anyone else’s musical choices? I’m not a big hip-hop fan simply because I am not aware of most of it. I have a hard enough time keeping up with everything in the country world. But I have no doubt there’s good music over there being drowned out by the commercial crap as well. Good music is universal, and genre snobs many times are depriving themselves of the best musical experience.

               1 likes

          • Woh woh woh… “living in a city is not a choice, but a privilege for the rich”. Normally, I don’t nitpick but I can’t let that one slide. Yes, I live in the city, and yes, I even live in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in it, but am I rich? Far from it. For the record: I have a great deal on a little apartment in a beautiful area. I’m underemployed and have to hustle everyday to make sure I don’t screw up the amazing opportunity I have by living here. I try not to buy things I can’t afford, and maintain a budget that stays within my means. Because I live where I do, I get a lot of classism where people think they can take advantage of me, charge me more, and dismiss me because they assume I can buy more things than they can.
            And if you really think that city living is only a privilege for the rich, I can show you neighborhoods within walking distance of my 500 square feet of paradise that will cure you of that misconception.

               3 likes

      • You make an interesting point. To me, living a country/small town way of life is something to be proud of and celebrated in music, but on the same token celebrating the negative stereotype of living this life seems detrimental to country music. There is a fine line between the two. Merle Haggard grew up in poverty and in trouble with the law. That lifestyle was reflected in many of his songs. His songs educate the listener on his life without being distasteful. They illustrate the struggles and hard times while providing a nostalgia for simpler times. That is what country music should be. Being from Georgia myself, I am sickened that my state is where this whole Country rap craze seems to be coming from. This is not country music and I’m sick of it. The younger generation here loves it and it depresses me. I just hate it. I feel like the music by most Georgia artists on the radio does not reflect the lifestyle that country/small town folk live here. There are some exceptions that I am proud of though, and that gives me some hope.
        On another note, I am a dipper. It something I started when I was young because I thought that’s what country people did. Not smart and not something I’m proud of or celebrate. It’s not something to be celebrated, but at the same time I do it. I guess I’m perpetuating the stereotype myself. LOL

           1 likes

        • By the way, this isn’t some old fart being judgemental of the kids’ music. I’m in my twenties. I just have an appreciation for real and deep Country Music that seems to have gone the way of the dinosaur…… and yes that is a Hank Jr. reference. LOL

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      • Exactly. These are the formerly rural whites who have been alienated from land, community, and extended family, but who haven’t moved up and out into another positive culture. As for the southern aspect, southern culture has been so demonised or marginalised in recent times, that the only way people feel they can have pride in it at all, is defiantly. That didn’t used to be true.

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  • My Uncle, who’s a big classic country fan, has chewed tobacco for most of his life. It’s something he’s tried to quit for years. It’s not something to sing about or take pride in.

    Apparently now all you have to do is sing about something country to be labeled country.

       1 likes

  • I don’t want to live on this planet anymore.

       2 likes

    • Same here, at least not as it’s constituted now. Wish I had a time machine (h/t Jules Verne).

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  • Please tell me I am not the only one who saw the humor in this. They arent taking themselves incredibly serious about this. They are making music that they know is a joke and having fun doing it. Is it terrible, yes. Do they know that, yes. In no way were they presenting this as a serious effort by them. Hits on youtube is a very innaccurate way to judge success. For all we know, its the same 30 friends of theirs and people that find it absolutely hillarious showing it to each other.

       1 likes

    • Without question there is a humor component here and we shouldn’t overlook that. But I don’t think that is all that is going on here, or that they think this is “terrible”. I think in general this is a serious song, with a slightly funny video. I think these dudes are huge fans of Mud Jugs, and that’s why they wrote it.

      With the explosion of social media, illegal downloads, the increasing irrelevance of radio, YouTube hits may be just as good of a measure of a band’s success or popularity as anything else. Even if it is just a bunch of their fans watching it over and over, this just proves they have strong grass roots, which a lot of these country rap bands do.

      Your point is not lost on me though. Some of the things going on in the video are made to be laughed at even if you love these guys. It may be a serious song, but one thing I’ll say about the “Jawga Boyz” is they probably don’t take themselves too seriously, and are willing to laugh at themselves. This is one redeeming quality I’ll give them credit for.

         0 likes

  • I’d love to have a charity boxing match with one or all of these guys. Kids with cultural brain damage getting their asses whooped for Kids With Cancer… Sounds good to me.

    BTW – There is nothing REMOTELY country about this song. This is cracker-hop. Hate to say it, but Kenny Cheesedick has more country cred than these crackers.

       3 likes

    • “kenny cheesedick”…this offiially added to my vocabulary. i’ll put it on the shelf next to “rascall Fags”

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  • This is not my kind of music at all. You won’t see me buying the album or even a single from this band. But I also don’t think they are destroying anything, I know for a fact they they aren’t “taking away your pride, your heritage, your farms, your music, your family life and sense of community.” I believe that is taking it a bit too far. It looks like they actually have their whole community out there with them, and they all look they are having fun. I watched all three of the videos from your article and I don’t think they are being serious in any of them. I believe this is all fun “music” for them. Half the time in their videos they can’t even stop laughing. So why are we, the people that don’t even listen to this getting mad? Obviously there are people out there wanting to hear this style of music, over one million people to be exact. I grew up in the middle of fucking nowhere in PA, even before I left PA and moved to CA in 97 there were rednecks driving around in their lifted trucks listening to rap. Those same folks also listened to radio country, so this is a perfect mix for them. I hate to say it, but this is the future of what is going to be on the radio. But don’t let it bother you, we don’t listen to the radio anyway to hear real country music. Just like people who like real punk rock or heavy metal don’t turn on the radio to hear music they like, we can’t either. It isn’t anything new. I can’t say I am surprised that pop country is turning into rap country. Look at popular music, it is changing from pop to rap itself. Maybe it is easy for me not to mind what is popular when it comes to music because I haven’t listened to popular music for 20 years.

       2 likes

    • I agree, there is a “fun” element to their music. They don’t take themselves too seriously, and we shouldn’t overlook that, or take them too seriously either.

      But this is how it effect us and why we should care. Please hear me out:

      This article is not called “I Hate The Jawga Boys And Here’s Why”, it is “Jawga Boyz Reinforce Negative Stereotypes”. I run a website called “Saving Country Music”. Do you know what 50% of the population thinks of when they hear the term “country?” They think of Jason Aldean, Colt Ford, and this, because that is what the popular media has sold them. What The Jawga Boyz are doing is taking the Hollywood, idiot bumpkin version of the redneck archetype and living it right off the script. Then they are broadcasting it to the masses, reinforcing the idea many Americans have that this is how people from the country live, and what they listen to.

      The Jawga Boys aren’t being played on the radio whether any of us are listening to it or not. They’re building up from the grass roots. They’re underground. THAT is what makes them an important study in the country rap world. Do you think Jawga Boyz and core country rap fans listen to Jason Aldean and his country rap hit “Dirt Road Anthem?” Many of them listen to Hank3 and Shooter Jennings. The Moonshine Bandits drop both Hank3 and Shooter in one of their songs. Shooter promotes The Moonshine Bandits on Twitter. He included a Young Struggle song on a XXX compilation. These people aren’t part of a far off scene that doesn’t effect us, they’re on our front porch, knocking to get in, and some are answering.

      And it effects me because I care, because I don’t want to see anyone suffocating from bad music and bad culture, or from a bad sense of self-worth forced on them by the mass media and a consumer-driven society. I want to give them a hand up, and point them towards the good stuff. I also want to put as much distance between myself and this shit so if there is any question, people know THIS is not what I’m talking about when I’m talking about country music.

      The Jawga Boyz may not need to be taken so seriously. But the trend of country rap should, especially now that it has constructed grass roots, and a strong foundation to build from. It may not be your fight, and I respect that. But it’s one I’ve chosen, and I won’t back down. However fruitless, somebody needs to give a voice of opposition.

         5 likes

      • I’ve never once seen Shooter promote the “Moonshine Bandits” on twitter or anywhere else.

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        • Not going to cull through Shooter’s unnecessary and unhelpful reams of overTwitter activity to find a better example, but this was from two days ago.

          The Moonshine Bandits also submitted a song for the XXX Comp. Vol. 3.

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          • So the “Moonshine Bandits” at tweeted Shooter and he responded. He responds to a lot of people. Hardly counts as “promoting” them. It’s possible that they submitted a song for Southern Independant 3, but if they did, it wasn’t chosen for the compilation.

               0 likes

      • It’s a joke. Have you heard the old joke “I like to shoot cans, MexiCANS, Peurto RiCANS, AfriCANS” hahaha, funny shit huh? Damn Trayvon, I was just jokin’.

        The fact is, over time, these messages do have a psychological impact. Most people reading this won’t start dipping because da jawga boys made it look so cool. But if you’re a kid who’s at the age where you put away the Ninja Turtles and graduating to Facebook and Youtube, you’ll come across a truckload of these ‘jokes’. No, we shouldn’t try to go on the attack and remove these things from sight. It is important to point them out from time to time, make distinctions and stimulate independent thought.

        Country/Rap is about blurring lines. Not just musical lines but the lines between jokes and reality. “Self-esteem” was mentioned. If a person is subjected to this message frequently enough, over a long period of time, they could lose the will to stand up when they truly are under attack. You’ve got to stand for something or you’ll fall for anything.

           3 likes

        • I suggest we gather up all of their records, put them in a huge pile and light them on fire Mr. Tippen….. Give me a break, the music may suck to you and me, but it’s not going to rot any kids brain… Period.

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          • If that was true there would be no reason to learn to read. Your mind could just make stuff up on its own.

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  • I made it two minutes into the video and couldn’t take any more.

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  • You say this is the worst. I can’t believe anything could be worse then Colt Ford doing Only Daddy That’ll Walk The Line, but if something out there is worse I don’t wont to here it. I’m affraid to press play.

       0 likes

    • A-fucking-men.

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  • cant stand this shit to be honest, and it seems to be getting progressively worse and worse. when will people wake up and put a end to it?

       1 likes

  • You guys got a problem with me. Bring it on boys

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  • Oh…I thought a “mudjug” was the south’s version of a “Cleveland steamer”.

       1 likes

  • those things are $40? seriously? those tiny little things?? $40??

       1 likes

  • Those boys should be shot, by each other.

       1 likes

  • Godamn Awful. I just rolled over in my own grave, What the hell is shooter thinking…

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  • Then again, i like Muck Sticky’s goofy ass. Go figure.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx6absF0cxo

       0 likes

  • I got dip in my lip. Dip in my lip. Dip in my lip and i think i need to spit I need a MudJug.
    Sounds pretty funny to me. Dont take everything so serious. I not a fan but it did make me laugh. I think old triggerman prob lost his lunch the first time he dipped and is a little bitter.

       1 likes

    • A few folks have been pointing out I need to not take this so serious, but I honestly don’t think I did. I did use it to springboard to a social theory I wanted to get out there, but as I said in the article:

      “This would be awful enough to get mad about if it wasn’t for the reams of unintended comedy packed throughout this song and video, giving it enough point-and-laugh moments to split your side wide open.”

         2 likes

      • I think that a lot of the comedy in this song and video are intentional though. I will say that you talking about how they are part of our scene and not the Aldean and Ford pop country scene is true, and worth worrying about. I never really thought about that before until you mentioned it, and perhaps an article about that opposed to being left in a comment section might educate more people on this.

        I wonder how much of the support they get from Shooter and XXX and “anti-Nashville” people is just because this type of rap-country is against Music Row as well. Sometimes it is better to look around you and see who count as friends opposed to just letting them in because you have a common goal.

           0 likes

  • This is some pretty funny stuff. Mud Jug would be a hilarious gift for some friends of mine. Not $40 funny.

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  • you are so stupid. this is an awesome song. you just need to go back to new york and stay out of our busniess. damn city boy

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    • Perfect!

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      • You got to get a “thumbs up” button on these posts, Trig.

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  • I can’t get worked up about this.

    Some stereotypes are true. From my travels across the country, people in the South are much more likely to dip than people up north. North and South, rural folks are more likely to dip than those in the Suburbs.

    I dipped in high school and college, and stopped when I moved up north, because most people here don’t do it. When I go back South and my old friends are packing one when we go fishing or hiking, I might take a dip for old times sake. So yes, I associate Dip with the South long before this stupid song.

    I’m sure you may not like the fact that this is part of Southern culture, but it is, and frankly always has been (what was the first staple crop in the South?)

    As for the Song, is it really country rap? I associate the genre with Colt Ford,rapping over steel guitars with an over-exaggerated Southern drawl;

    This sounds like just regular rap, while singing about stupid redneck stereotypes. The point and it’s semi ironic that you are rapping about such non-hip hop topics.

    I think the song isn’t funny, and I hate all rap, but I don’t see it as emblematic as anything besides a few rednecks trying to be funny. It’s more in the vain of people ironically rapping about law school or being conservative.

    see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkeZ2P4SiY8
    or http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-JFzNpKAnY

    I don’t find either of these particularly funny;l but they aren’t creating the dreaded law student hip hop monoculture.

       1 likes

  • This is insulting and I am more embarrassed that they are showing the Rebel Flag in this video. This actually makes Colt Ford tolerable and that is very hard to do.

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  • The thing about you saying this song reinforces stereotypes, well what about Hank III’s song six pack of beer? I think the difference is probally that these guys seem like a bunch of tools and they really have no trace of country in their music. What do you think?

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  • If someone unfamiliar with the South watched this without anything else to go by, I wouldn’t even blame them for thinking we’re all idiots down here.

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  • Okay, what’s a mudjug? Is it that gross stuff that dude was drinking? It looked like urine with tea leaves floating in it.

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  • Since when do you have to sound like Hank Sr, Willie, Waylon, or Cash to be country?! It all started with “Outlaw Country” from some of “country’s” greatest artists. Hank Jr., David Allen Coe and the rest of them paved the way for people to be different and sing (or rap) about controversial things! Do I LOVE the song, NO, but who are you to say that they aren’t “country” just because there’s no banjo playing and they aren’t singing about jail, trains, momma, or their coon dog?!

       5 likes

  • Didnt make it thru the whole video, but I’m thinking it had to be a joke by whoever put it together it looked like something you would see on sat night live it was like a bad parody. What’s kinda scary is I can’t tell the difference with all the horrible music out there if these guys actually think they are artists and if the million people who hit em up on youtube actually think its a cool song

       3 likes

    • These boyz are just having fun, and their music makes me laugh my ass off. Hats off to the Boyz ! God bless America!

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  • Just want to say thanks for the exposure, and the article. Our music, and our videos are all for fun, but we don’t make it up. What you see is how we live, and who we are. Of course the kids are not really dipping in the video, they’ve got a tootsie roll in their mouth..lol. Of course we know that we would have haters, but any exposure is good exposure in my book. What began as something fun to play around with, has turned into a demand from fans across the world. Just remember how the Outlaws of country music made a name for themselves. The labels and the radio stations lost that battle, and the Outlaw Country legends changed the music scene. We’re not here to change country music though, we’re here to create a new genre. We call it Hick Hop, and it’s already being marketed as we speak. To be honest with you, we thought we’d have more haters from the Hip Hop world, than from the Country Music world. But we’ve been embraced into the Hip Hop community because it’s all about having freedom of expression. And we also want to show the world, that the stereotype of rednecks being racist is not true. Once again, what we’re doing has nothing to do with Country music, but it has everything to do with how WE as individuals live everyday. We’d like to thank everyone for your input, good or bad. One thing we all have in common, is that we live in the greatest country in the world! Oh, and we support more MADE IN AMERICA products!

    -Jawga Boyz

       29 likes

    • yal are my idols never stop what you are doing

         5 likes

    • i happen to love these guys, no one makes you listen to them. if you don’t like them fine, stop listening and shut the f up!!!

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      • I don’t like them, won’t listen to them, and don’t have to shut the “f” up about it. Now what?

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    • Is “hick hop” another name for fornicating with your cousin?

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    • THE JAWGA BOYZ ROCK FUCK. THEM WHO HATIN

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  • You know I live in the country I own 3 or 4 mudd juggs and I like there music

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  • yal need to stop hating. im a teen redneck and the world is changing. as a proud georgia boy we like it yal dont have to.

       6 likes

  • ok so I sat here and read the article, as if that wasnt bad enough, I then read the comments. Bottom Line? You people are bashing something that is irrelevant! Is the song funny? Yes, However, that song is a joke, yes they promote the mudjugs but that doesnt mean anything. If some of you would actually take the time and listen to alot of the other songs on their album then maybe you wouldnt be so quick to judge. But then again you probably would because the fact of the matter is, they arent main stream, they havent been played on the radio over and over again which means they havent brain washed you like every other artist in the world has.No they arent some stupid pop group who has a company with tons of money backing them, these boys started with nothign, they have done it ALL themselves, They make their choices not some executive sitting behind a desk. So how about instead of bashing them, you take the time to actually listen to THE REST of the music and give these boys a chance? You never know it might just grow on you.
    And one more thing, Everyone was so hyped up about the fact that they promote dipping, so let me ask you this,would you rather they promote that or shooting someone in the street because they looked at their girl or some other irrelevant and pointless thing the way most rappers do? Personally if I had to choose (and I have) I would choose the lesser of the two evils for my kids to listen to!!
    The Jawga Boyz arent anything thing to get huffy over they’re just some good ole country boys having fun in life so get off your high horse and just chill Its not that serious people I mean really!

       13 likes

  • You also have to remember that
    there are people out therewho like this music and I’ve heard a “true” country done that Is all about copenhagen so cut them some slack

       1 likes

  • Are you really that stupid? Your jugement by one video how bout lissin to some of there outher songs. And not im not a so called poser im a born and raised countryboy ive worked my hole life on a farm and just liveing my own life you dont see me messin with yalls. so why dont you stay out of theres beacuse they can judge you the same way as your doing them. ive been dipin since i was 8 and now im 18 and not by anyones choice but my own not tryin to me cool but beacuse i like the taste. you know theres alot worce out there. so why do you have to judge on them, how bout this you go think about how your life has been and what youve done wrong before you judge outhers? btw i achly have met them beacuse i do have a friend related to them and you know what they dont judge people like you

       3 likes

  • I say if people like it they can listen to it and if you dont then dont fucking listen to it,its that simple. and seriously this is like so high school drama shit GROW UP!! Its not hurting you in any way so just shut the fuck up and keep your opinion to yourself. and by the way if your going to talk shit grow a pair and say it to thier faces not on a damn chat page. and about the dip if you dont like it dont do it its that fucking simple. and if you dont like seeing people do it either dont put yourself around it or just ignore it, it could be worse…

       3 likes

  • WOW! Hell of a rant there boy! Sounds to me like you have a problem with Southern culture not the dismantling of country music! First off, The mention that “country people’s” self-esteem and traditional culture based on geography, community, and family has been robbed from them is total BS! Where in the hell did you get that from? Are you refering to country music fans or is that a derogatory shot at people from the south by a possible uptight “Blue State” bastard ? I think the latter! What kind of crap is “and so to fit in and feel accepted and part of something bigger than themselves, they latch onto whatever dominant culture is presented to them through popular media?” So now the “country people” have no mind of their own, and are incapable of making decisions of their own free will. Seems to me that the Southern states those “country people” did not jump in to the big blue pool like the rest of you Northern Lemmings! And to say” They’re taking away your pride, your heritage, your farms, your music, your family life and sense of community,” Is totally absurd! If you belive that than you are the idiot I think you are! People from the South have more pride in their heritage and more sense of family than you will ever have. You need to rename your site My insecurities! Saving country music MY ASS! The only detriment to country music is you and this pile of cat shit that you call a heathy replacement to the Jawga Boyz! Who in the hell are the Carolina chocolate drops and what in the hell are they doing? You call this music? I’ll take Jason Aldean, Colt Ford and the Jawga Boyz any day of the week over that crap with their 6,000 Youtube views! I’ll leave you with a few snippets from Shooter Jennings, “Hey pretty boy in your cowboy hat couldn’t hit country with a baseball bat! Country aint just about where your at it’s about being true to what’s inside of you! Listen son YOU AINT GOTTA CLUE you can’t buy truth.Tell you what they should do! THEY SHOULD OUTLAW YOU!!!

       7 likes

  • LONG LIVE THE HICK HOP NATION!

       5 likes

  • This article was clearly written by a liberal….

       5 likes

  • “stereotype perpetuated by the media and Hollywood…”

    jews own hollywood and the media…its all by design feller

       4 likes

  • This review is ridiculous! If you are a PROUD redneck, you would not find any of this offensive.. the stuff they sing about are daily activities of a dumb hill billy that throws caution to the wind. Get off your high horse!

       4 likes

  • I read this article and actually couldn’t help but laugh, you obviously took the video way too seriously. I’m from Texas and I honestly laughed my ass of at the whole “country people’s” self-esteem and traditional culture based on geography, community, and family has been robbed from them.” If you really think that than you’ve obviously never been to the south. None of us have “low self esteem” from living where we do, were proud of it, we work for what we have and never take things for granted. We don’t “latch on” to music that supposedly makes us feel better or whatever. I listen to the Jawga Boyz and have no problem about my heritage. In fact everyone I know listen to it and have no problem with the words in the song, and we’re not “uneducated”. Then again I can turn around and listen to Hank, Willie, and Waylon with no problem. If you don’t like the music the Jawga Boyz put out don’t listen…it’s as simple as that.

       4 likes

    • If you really think that than you’ve obviously never been to the south.

      Ha!

         2 likes

      • Trigger, I am from the south-deep south, MS-raised in the country, back in a day when that was a real divide-no internet, and in my home, no teevee. I totally agree with your insights. I’m not ashamed of my heritage, but dipping wasn’t part of it for the country people among whom I was raised. Although my grandmother was half Choctaw and smoked a corncob pipe. I think this also a generational thing, because my kind of “country”, “southern” people would not have recognised this as either of those things.

           1 likes

  • To say that country rap or “hick hop” is destroying country music is ridiculous. Ever since there has been music, people have been borrowing influence from what they hear and combining it in their own way. It is not for ignorant, self-loathing southerners only: I grew up in Minnesota, have never lived in the south, and am a month from graduating from law school and there is music that falls in this vein that I enjoy immensely. If you think this genre is a joke, I would submit in retort Bubba Sparxxx. His album Deliverance is the most underrated record of the last 20 years hands down. It is phenomenal, and I am far from the only one who thinks so.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deliverance_(Bubba_Sparxxx_album)
    He is a ridiculously talented MC and combines his diverse influences seamlessly. He also doesn’t shy away from talking about his problems with addiction, fear, and self doubt. I love all kinds of music, and I know greatness when I hear it. Like it or not, you cannot possibly dismiss Bubba as a novelty act if you know anything about music.
    My point is country music does not need to be saved. There will continue to be country, and there will continue to be innovators who will experiment by combining country that has influenced them with influences from other genres. Glorifying one’s culture, good and bad, is not new to country rap: “true country” has been glorifying drinking, cheating and murder since it has existed. It gives you a snapshot into the the way people live, their struggles, fears, triumphs, joys, all of it. Great music is great because it rings with truth. Country rap is simply a natural extension of music, and there is and will continue to be great country rap just like there is great every other type of music. Jawga Boyz fall in that lineage, no different from any other branch in the musical family tree. In the words of one of my musical heroes, Bradley Nowell, “Good music is good music and that should be good enough for anybody”.

       6 likes

  • who seriously took enough time out of there prius to write an article talking about how horrible music by the jawga boyz is its fun music that people relate to i thought this was a free america! If people stopped caring about things that have no relevance to them and stopped being so stuck up the asses of everyone else they would realize you live a short life stop worrying about the little things in life and live a little serious im sure your mom told you if you have nothing nice to say dont say anything at all

       3 likes

  • Taken from an article written by Trig himself on October 14th, 2013:

    “Saying the mainstream has nothing good to offer is narrowing your musical experience no different than saying that music is bad because it’s not popular. Life is too short to impose unnecessary limitations on your music perspective”

    Pot calling the kettle black if you ask me.

    By standing on the opinion that hick hop artists are reinforcing negative stereotypes is like saying that mainstream country artists reinforce alcoholism and domestic abuse. I can listen to any mainstream corporate owned radio channel and hear and endless number of songs that send the message that drinking is fun and necessary for socializing or that vandalizing and/or terrorizing your ex-lover because they cheated on you is the norm.

    I find your opinion in this blog post irrelevant to your mission of “saving country music”. Hick hop is it’s own brand of music, culture and community. It’s not country music and it’s not destroying it. Sadly, hick hop will eventually become mainstream, bought by corporations and sold out. Just like your mainstream country pop music. When that happens, then you can complain. The only bright spot to that path is the fact that there will always be outlaw artists who form the cutting edge of music, pushing the envelope. Yeah, Hank didn’t do it that way but neither did Waylon, Johnny or Willie.

       3 likes

    • I’ve read your comment three times, and still don’t understand what Catch-22 you think you’ve caught me with here, or what specifically you’re trying to say. I never said hick hop artists are reinforcing stereotypes, I said The Jawga Boyz, and specifically this song and video are. And what I said about mainstream music I’ve said about country rap, or hick hop as well.

      http://www.savingcountrymusic.com/country-rap-is-here-a-survivors-guide

      “Do not diminish the arguments against country rap by lumping all country rap together. I am sure there has been in the past, and will be in the future, some blends of country and rap that are respectful to the roots of the music, and enjoyable to listen to while not insulting the intelligence of the listener. These projects will likely be ignored by the radio and the industry, but it is not fair to the honesty and heartfelt approach of these artists who are breeding originality through bridging artforms to lump them in with the Jason Aldean’s of the world.”

      And hick hop is already mainstream. It was in 2011 when “Dirt Road Anthem” was the biggest-selling country song.

         1 likes

  • I think back to CW McCall and “Convoy”. Why hasn’t a country act done a relevant song, whether lighthearted, novelty-type, or more serious, about the internet, or its impact on family life? I know the CB radio held a different place in “country” culture-truckers and all that-but the explosion of the internet in American life could be pointed up from that POV.

       0 likes

  • This article is utterly bourgoise. I just came across the Jawga Boyz this morning while surfing morel hunting videos. Some hunters had this weird hick rap on while driving to their mushroom spot and I was curious. First off, get smart on your chewing tobacco health facts. It is far less dangerous than smoking and there’s statistics to prove it. I don’t enjoy their music and much prefer Bill Evans or the like, but I don’t look down on those who like to spend their time in nature. Your article comes across as a little out of touch. Go bow hunting or fishing somewhere in the woods and maybe you’ll begin to understand these hillbillies. It is their way of life that will win out in the end, not an ever complicated green city.

       1 likes

  • I ont see why yal be hatin on them like that if you ont like them who freakin cares dont listen to the its that simple, i actulay like several of ther songs but mud jug is the only one i relly ont like

       0 likes

  • Listen up. To all you city folks who think your doing us better by “caring” for us and feeling bad because were “stupid” and “lost our culture”. We sure as hell ain’t stupid because I’m pretty sure not a damn one of you city slickers can even change your own oil, let alone do the everyday maitenence on your car. Not only that but you also frown upon the skilled workers of America because apparently we didn’t get a bachelors and were “dumb”. I would love to see if any of you can even turn the water or electricity off in your own homes or even simply get a fire started without outside assistance. For the past thirty years this country has rejected thoughts of becoming a skilled worker and all of a sudden is in dire need of them because were about 200,000 short across the nation. And who do you think is trying to fill those gaps but cant because were plastered as dumb hicks. So the next time any of you think we need “help” or think were “dumb”, think again. This video of the Jawga Boys just shows some young guys doin what we do best and that’s just having fun. It might be a shocker to you slickers but we like to do what we like to do and don’t want you buttin in thinkin your looking out for our well being. Bottom line is, stay out of our business and we will stay out of yours. If you don’t like that, then move back to yankee country where you belong with the rest of the liberals because we don’t want you down here.

       1 likes

  • WTF is that bullcrap the carolina drops its some weak sauce

       0 likes

  • If you don’t like it, don’t listen to it! This is America…I have the right to listen to what I want to listen to – as do you.
    I couldn’t take more than 10 seconds of that video you posted of the woman doing something…it wasn’t singing or rapping…just pure insanity. But, whatever floats your boat, brother! To each his own.
    If you can’t handle that, you need to get a life…and a sense of humor.

       0 likes

  • lmao you all are pathetic jawga boyz has some GOOD songs and they made money off of a song that is a commercial. fucking haters. what are you doing? talking shit about people that made it behind your ever protective screen grow the fuck up

       0 likes

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